Trauma Talks
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8:00am

Registration

8:45 to 9:00am

Welcome & Opening Remarks
Dr. Dana Ross & Dr. Carrie Clark, Trauma Talks Program Co-Chairs

9:00 - 10:00am

Keynote Address – Levine Family Lectureship*

Ruth Lanius, MD, PhD
Topic: Complex Adaptation to Psychological Trauma: Toward a Recovered Self

10:00 - 10:15am

Q&A Session

10:15 - 10:45am

Refreshment Break & Networking

10:45 - 12:00pm

Concurrent Session #1
 
Workshop A
Auditorium

Trauma and the Body: Understanding the Connection between Attach Cry and Self-Care, A New Group Intervention based on Principles of Sensorimotor Psychotherapy

Presenters: Dr. Nancy McCallum, MD, MSc, FRCP(C); Pat Woods, RN; and Bonilyn Hill Mohamed, MEd., RP
Presentation Format: Invited Workshop from the Women's College Hospital Women's Mental Health Program
Skill level: All
Abstract: Sensorimotor psychotherapy is a body-oriented modality which provides an understanding of how trauma remains somatically truncated influencing fear states long beyond the traumatic event. Using principles of sensorimotor psychotherapy, the Trauma Therapy Program at Women’s College Hospital implemented a group addressing the way trauma remains active as a result of truncated animal defensive responses (fight, flight, freeze and feigned death) and leads to dysregulated states of arousal. Therapist observation and client feedback led to exploration of the connection between another animal defensive response, attach cry – the cry for help when we are in danger – and clients’ continued struggle to maintain a healthy self-care practice and overcome the impact of trauma on beliefs about the self and self-worth. Using attachment theory and our understanding of the attach cry defense, therapists created and piloted a group for adults who have experienced childhood interpersonal trauma focused on a mindful exploration of the attach cry and the ways in which unmet needs have impacted clients’ relationship to tending to themselves emotionally and somatically. Presenters will describe the theoretical basis for the development of this group, discuss timing, inclusion criteria and preparation for clients. An overview of group structure, content and process will be presented, and client feedback from the pilot groups will be shared.

Learning Objectives:
Participants in this workshop will be able to:

  1. Describe the principles of Sensorimotor Psychotherapy and how it can be utilized within a group setting.
  2. Describe the relationship between attachment theory, the attach cry defense and ways in which clients’ relationship to self-care may be impacted by early attachment wounds.
  3. Demonstrate strategies to support the development of self-care practices as a fundamental aspect of healing from trauma.

Dr. Nancy McCallum, MD, MSc, FRCP(C); Pat Woods, RN; and Bonilyn Hill Mohamed, MEd., RP

Workshop B
Pink Cube East

Emotional Freedom Techniques (EFT/tapping) for Trauma-Informed Treatment

Presenters: Nancy E. Forrester, Executive Director, National Emotional Freedom Techniques Training Institute; Lynda M. Rees, RN, RMFT, M.Sc
Presentation Format: Workshop
Skill Level: All
Abstract: Emotional Freedom Techniques (EFT) is an evidence based, mind body therapeutic modality that brings significant value to trauma informed practice. The most highly researched form of energy psychology, over 84 studies support its effectiveness for anxiety, depression, chronic pain, and PTSD.
EFT facilitates gentle, rapid results through its innovative blend of cognitive-behavioural, affective and somatic therapies combined with self-application of eastern acupressure techniques.
Importantly, EFT not only provides value to patients, but also offers compassion fatigue protection for clinicians.
This workshop explains how EFT integrates within Herman’s Tri-Phasic trauma therapy approach:
Phase One: Stabilization
a) Using EFT therapeutically and as self-help for emotional and physiological self-regulation and symptom management, empowering patients to reliably create internal and external safety.
b) Using EFT, within a patient led and controlled process, to enhance trust and collaboration in the therapeutic relationship.
Phase Two: Trauma Memory Processing
How EFT offers a targeted and titrated trauma resolution strategy reducing abreactions to nil and elevating patient hope, expectancy and compliance.
Phase Three: Reconnection
How EFT clears residue from trauma-defined beliefs and personality traits, empowering the patient to redefine how they choose to feel, think and act today to create the meaningful life they desire.

Learning objectives:
The participant will:

  1. Describe the brain/body neuroscience underlying EFT’s effectiveness.
  2. Explain the breadth and depth of how EFT is integrated into a tri-phasic trauma treatment plan.
  3. Demonstrate the basic EFT algorithm.

Nancy E. Forrester, Executive Director, National Emotional Freedom Techniques Training Institute; Lynda M. Rees, RN, RMFT, M.Sc

Paper Session
Pink Cube West

Integrating a Trauma-informed, Child Rights Approach to Addressing the Needs of Children Exposed to Traumatic Life Experience Globally

Presenters: Shraddha Prabhu, MSW, PhD, Edinboro University of Pennsylvania; Molly R. Wolf, LMSW, PhD, Edinboro University of Pennsylvania
Presentation Format: Paper
Skill level: All
Abstract: The Convention on the Rights of the Child is one of the most widely ratified human rights treaties in the history of the United Nations (Human Rights Watch, 2014). Yet children continue to face various forms of violence within homes, at school, at work, in communal spaces, and over the internet (United Nations Children’s Fund, 2014). Societal crises such as armed conflicts or natural disasters further precipitate direct and vicarious exposure to trauma (United Nations Children’s Fund, 2016). These adverse life experiences can have profound immediate and long-term negative impacts on the brains, minds and bodies of children (Shavers, 2013, Van der Kolk, 2015).
In this paper, we examine the intersections of class, gender, race, ethnicity, disability, sexuality, socio-cultural practices, and geo-politics for their impact on the extent and nature of vulnerability experienced by children. We review the extant literature to identify trauma-specific treatment approaches to ameliorate children’s trauma symptoms. We also present best practice approaches to incorporating trauma-informed care in settings (such as school, community centers) that work with children to maximize opportunities for children to feel empowered and experience safety. Lastly, we discuss how trauma-informed approaches organically uphold the core principles of children’s rights.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will be able to identify the various forms of violence faced by children and the context in which they occur around the world;
  2. Participants will be able to describe and discuss the impact of exposure to violence against children on the mental, emotional and physical health within a child rights framework;
  3. Participants will be able to discuss best practice approaches in trauma treatment with children as well as the importance of incorporating a trauma informed care and child rights approach to community development and public policy advocacy efforts.

Shraddha Prabhu, MSW, PhD, Edinboro University of Pennsylvania; Molly R. Wolf, LMSW, PhD, Edinboro University of Pennsylvania

Mental health and substance use among an urban Indigenous population in Toronto, Canada

Presenter: Michelle Firestone, PhD, Research Scientist, Well Living House, Centre for Urban Health Solutions, St. Michael’s Hospital; Assistant Professor, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto
Co-authors: Janet Smylie, MD, Research Scientist, Well Living House, Centre for Urban Health Solutions, St. Michael’s Hospital; Professor, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto
Sara Wolfe, RM MBA, Seventh Generation Midwives Toronto
Presentation Format: Paper
Skill level: All
Abstract:
Introduction: The recent Canadian Truth and Reconciliation (TRC) report highlighted the impacts of colonization, including family disruption and dislocation from traditional lands and resultant health and social inequities. The report included calls to action to address these inequities. In urban centres, planning of Indigenous health services is hampered by critical gaps in population health information.  Our Health Counts Toronto addresses this by beginning to provide a better understanding of mental health and substance use among Indigenous people.
Methods: Our Health Counts uses Indigenous community driven processes to generate a primary data platform and address gaps in understanding urban Indigenous mental health and substance use behaviours.  Using a comprehensive questionnaire, trained interviewers surveyed First Nations, Inuit and Métis adults in Toronto recruited by respondent driven sampling. This allowed for the generation of population-level prevalence estimates. Statistical analysis was used to characterize and describe the results.
Results: Nearly half of participants (45%) reported diagnosis of a psychological/mental health disorder from a healthcare worker (n=917). High rates of lifetime self-harm (45%), suicidal ideation (53%) and suicide attempts (36%) were also reported as well as high rates of depression and PTSD. In the past 12 months, 63% of the population reported cannabis use, 22% crack/cocaine use, 18% prescription opioid misuse, and 40% of the population reported excessive alcohol use within the past 12 months.
Discussion: Our Health Counts responded to the need for high quality, comprehensive, and inclusive health assessment data about the health status and health needs of urban First Nations, Metis and Inuit peoples. Indigenous populations in Toronto experience a disproportionate burden of health inequities, including mental health disorders and substance use. These findings begin to unpack mental health and substance use, identifying that a collegial, coordinated and strategic approach to working with Indigenous communities is required to help improve our health and wellbeing.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Explain the rationale, principles and methods of RDS used in the Our Health Counts Project.
  2. Describe the key mental health and substance use outcomes for Indigenous adults in Toronto.
  3. Discuss implications for future program planning and policy development in urban Indigenous mental health and healing in Canada.

Michelle Firestone, PhD, Research Scientist, Well Living House, Centre for Urban Health Solutions, St. Michael’s Hospital; Assistant Professor, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto

The Results of a Trauma-Informed Intervention on Staff and Clients

Presenters: Travis Hales, MSW, PhD Candidate; Samantha Koury, LMSW; Sue Green, LCSW, Clinical Associate Professor
Presentation Format: Paper
Skill Level: All
Abstract:
Background: Trauma-Informed Care (TIC) is widely adopted amongst health and human service organizations. However, little is known on the impact of TIC implementation. Previous research has tied TIC to possible improvement in client outcomes and staff satisfaction. The current study adds to the existing literature by examining the influence of implementing TIC on organizational, staff, and client outcomes.
Methods: The current study examined the impact of a two-year TIC implementation project. The implementation design included intensive training, mentoring, coaching, continuous consultation, and train-the-trainer and championship development for sustainability purposes.
Results: At the end of the two-year implementation process, the organization had reduced the number of unplanned client discharges, while both staff and clients experienced an increase in their satisfaction with the organization. There were also positive changes to the organization’s climate, and the agency’s policies, procedures, and practices were more closely aligned with a TI organizational approach.
Discussion: The current study adds to the existing TIC evidence-base by demonstrating an association between TIC implementation and a variety of organizational, staff, and client outcomes. Ultimately, the current study provides evidential support for implementing TIC. Continued examination of the impact implementing TIC has across stakeholders is encouraged.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Demonstrate the most recent evidence on the impact of implementing TIC,
  2. Identify strategies to implement and sustain TIC in your agency, and
  3. Evaluate the impact of TIC in your program/organization.

Travis Hales, MSW, PhD Candidate; Samantha Koury, LMSW; Sue Green, LCSW, Clinical Associate Professor

Workshop C
Rm 1441

Creating Shared Empathy and Increased Attachment using Self-Regulation Therapy with Couples

Presenter: Irene Boxer-Meyrowitz, M.Ed., M.M.F.T.  
Presentation Format: Workshop 
Skill level: Intermediate 
Relevant population: Clients in couple’s therapy, where one or both members of the couple are trauma survivors.  
Abstract: 
Relevance to conference theme:  
Utilizing brain/body connection to integrate TIC principles with couple’s therapy. Clients gain a sense of safety, ability to re-establish trust/ softening towards their partners, balancing equilibrium, empowerment, and reactivating a healthy social engagement system.  
Introduction to the topic & main points to be covered:  
A self-regulation approach offers couples relief from distress, increased attunement, and emotionally regulated relationships. Each partner witnesses the other sensing into their nervous system’s “felt sense.” Experiencing access to this portal presents an opportunity for creating empathy for the other, as it increases a shared understanding of their partner’s attachment landscape. This approach is especially useful for trauma survivors.   
Presenter will discuss this clinical approach as it takes in the shared somatic sense, and moves beyond to emotions. It creates change on a deep level, allowing couples to cut through thoughts, and even emotions, to the core of their attachment patterns.  
The works of Peter Levine, Sue Johnson, John Gottman, and Dan Siegel will be referenced.  
The presenter will do a live demonstration of Self-Regulation Therapy.   

Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will list /describe steps associated with this self-regulatory couple’s therapy model.
  2. Participants will view a live demonstration of self-regulation therapy in the workshop, highlighting the value of working with a regulated nervous system.

Irene Boxer-Meyrowitz, M.Ed., M.M.F.T.

Workshop D
Rm 6214

Finding Sanctuary: Creating the Neural Pathways of Healing through Yoga Nidra

Presenters: Steven Hughes, M.Ed., Education Specialist, Education Services, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health; Rachael Frankford, M.S.W., R.S.W., Private Practice Psychotherapist 
Presentation Format: Workshop 
Skill Level: All 
Abstract: This experiential session will introduce to the mind-body practice of yoga nidra. This practice comes to us from the Yoga tradition and is demonstrating evidence of its healing benefits for trauma survivors. Specifically, the benefits include: an enhanced felt-sense of safety in the body and the emergence of presence with increasing joy and equanimity with continued practice over time. The underlining brain mechanisms involved support the movement towards the “left frontal shift” and to skilfully limit rumination that is associated with the default mode network. The session will situate the practice within an embodied discipline that supports healing for anyone with or without a trauma history.  

*Note for Participants: Please bring a yoga mat, blanket and a variety of coloured pencils and/or gel pens. Participants who cannot comfortably access the floor can still participate by sitting in a chair. 

Learning objectives:

  1. Experience and develop the skill of relaxing your physical body fully while the mind remains awake and focused. Clarify the difference between "spaciousness" versus "spacieness" supporting the emergence of presence.
  2. Distinguish between "thinking" and the "felt-sense of sensation," sensing the flow of breath and the radiant sense of energy in the body.
  3. Experience the imaginal environment via guided imagery to create an internal sense of safety and an enhanced self-efficacy by creating an inner safe sanctuary that can be accessed at any time as a way to ground and centre one's self.

Steven Hughes, M.Ed., Education Specialist, Education Services, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health; Rachael Frankford, M.S.W., R.S.W., Private Practice Psychotherapist

12:00 - 1:15pm

Lunch (on your own*) & Poster Session
There are numerous food outlets on the main floor of Women’s College Hospital and in the surrounding area. The Poster Session will be held on the second floor of the Women’s College Hospital, between the Auditorium and the Pink Cube.

1:15 - 2:30

Concurrent Session #2
 
Workshop A
Auditorium

What Queer Folks Want Trauma Therapists to Know

Presenters: Leah Keating, Ph.D., C.Psych. (Supervised Practice), Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Psychology, York University; Jenna MacKay, M.S.W. 
Collaborators: Robert T. Muller, Ph.D., C.Psych.; Greta R. Bauer, Ph.D.; Margaret Robinson, Ph.D.; Paul Frewen, Ph.D., C.Psych.; Lori E. Ross, Ph.D. 
Presentation Format: Workshop 
Skill Level: All 
Abstract: This workshop aims to improve mental health care for LGBTQ+ people who have experienced trauma. Two queer-identified, early career therapists and researchers, who have experience working with members of the LGBTQ+ community, will facilitate the workshop. Scant research has examined the mental health needs of LGBTQ+ people who have experienced trauma. The workshop will briefly review what is known about trauma among LGBTQ+ populations. Each facilitator will then present findings from Ontario-based studies on which they have collaborated. The first author will present findings from a mixed-methods study on LGBTQ+ adults’ experiences of trauma therapy. The second author will present the findings from a mixed-methods study on bisexual mental health, summarizing rates and types of trauma, as well as microaggressions (or insidious trauma) experienced when accessing mental health care. Participants in both studies reported heterosexist and cis-sexist experiences accessing care, which pose a barrier to accessing and benefiting from therapy. Grounded in this knowledge, the presenters will explore practical strategies to improve the mental health care of LGBTQ+ people through a trauma-informed lens. This interactive workshop will provide opportunities to apply the learning through self-reflective, didactic and small group activities. 

Learning Objectives:

  1. Describe experiences of trauma common within LGBTQ+ communities and describe ways therapists can make trauma therapy more accessible to LGBTQ+ people.
  2. List and identify behaviours that LGBTQ+ people may experience as harmful to their therapy.
  3. Demonstrate increased awareness of, and skills in implementing, practical steps to improve therapists’ practice with LGBTQ+ individuals.

Leah Keating, Ph.D., C.Psych. (Supervised Practice), Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Psychology, York University; Jenna MacKay, M.S.W.

Workshop B
Pink Cube East

Integrating Neurofeedback into Psychotherapy for the Treatment of Trauma

Presenters: Rachael Frankford, MSW, RSW, Clinical Social Worker in private practice; Ava Walters Cout, MSW, RSW, Clinical Social Worker in private practice; Daniel Cout, MSW, RSW, Clinical Social Worker in private practice 
Presentation Format: Workshop 
Skill Level: Intermediate 
Abstract: Neurofeedback is a non-invasive therapy that enhances brain and body functioning by helping the brain change itself and is increasingly being integrated with psychotherapy treatment for trauma.  Based on the principles of neuroplasticity, the brain and autonomic nervous system are trained to self-regulate by shaping brain wave activity with the use of EEG biofeedback reflected back to client through a video display.  As EEG biofeedback technology becomes more accessible for clinical use, therapists are looking for information about best practices and understanding of how neurofeedback assists in the regulation of arousal.  This workshop will introduce Infra Low Frequency (ILF) and Alpha Theta (AT) training as methods that specifically address symptoms of dysregulated arousal in the body, commonly experienced with those overcoming trauma.  Case studies will be discussed to illustrate the integration of ILF and AT training into psychotherapy treatment for trauma.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Describe the principles of neurofeedback training in improving brain function and the regulation of arousal in the body.
  2. Explain the rationale for Infra Low Frequency and Alpha Theta training to assist in the treatment and resolution of trauma.
  3. Describe how neurofeedback can improve outcomes for trauma treatment when integrated with traditional talk therapy and practical considerations for introducing this method into a psychotherapy practice.

Rachael Frankford, MSW, RSW, Clinical Social Worker in private practice; Ava Walters Cout, MSW, RSW, Clinical Social Worker in private practice; Daniel Cout, MSW, RSW, Clinical Social Worker in private practice

Workshop C
Pink Cube West

Movement for Embodied Resilience

Presenters: Jane Clapp, creator of the Movement for Trauma professional training program and co-founder of Trauma Informed Practitioners Collective; Jennifer Cardoso, Trauma Informed Yoga Teacher, Movement for Trauma Educational Coordinator and Teacher 
Presentation Format: Workshop 
Skill Level: All 
Abstract: Jane Clapp, creator of the Movement for Trauma professional training program and co-founder of Trauma Informed Practitioners Collective, and Jennifer Cardoso, Trauma Informed Yoga Teacher, Movement for Trauma Educational Coordinator and Teacher, will demonstrate several accessible movement interventions that bridge brain and body with trauma-informed care. These interventions have been developed and refined with the support of empirical research and brought together through training in numerous movement modalities including scientific strength and mobility, yoga, ELDOA, fascial system research, trauma-informed mindfulness, and Sensorimotor Psychotherapy. 

Learning Objectives:

  1. Different balance tools and activities to trigger the righting reflex to break patterns of immobilization and harness the benefits of the righting reflex to maximize efficient self-regulation both in therapeutic settings and client self-regulation outside of sessions. These activities have also been shown to help an individual reconnect with play and pleasure through their body.
  2. How fine and gross motor exercises can decouple physiological activation from emotional affect. When engaging clients in higher intensity interval activity, interwoven with movements that require a high degree of focus, Jane has observed improved distress tolerance in clients while improving a sense of self efficacy for physiological regulation.
  3. Simple, accessible and portable self-regulation movements that are beneficial for a client to use when outside their window of tolerance — both in the therapeutic setting and on their own. The resources presented in the Traumatic Stress Tool Kit are ideal for therapists to engage in to help prevent secondary or vicarious trauma in their own nervous system. Resources include bilateral movements to improve focus and concentration, exercises that promote connection with the body as an emotional container, activities to cultivate a sense of strength and resilience in the body, and down regulation techniques to employ before sleep.

Jane and Jennifer will provide simple neuro-scientific background behind the efficacy of these techniques, will demonstrate many of these movement interventions and strategies, and participants will have the opportunity to engage with the tools and exercises to experience immediate nervous system benefits in their own body.

Jane Clapp, creator of the Movement for Trauma professional training program and co-founder of Trauma Informed Practitioners Collective; Jennifer Cardoso, Trauma Informed Yoga Teacher, Movement for Trauma Educational Coordinator and Teacher

Workshop D
Rm 1441

An Introduction to Trauma-Informed Drama Therapy with Early Adolescents

Presenters: Christine Mayor, MA, BCT/RDT, PhD student, Lyle S. Hallman Faculty of Social Work, Wilfrid Laurier; Jason S. Frydman, MA, RDT, LCAT, PhD candidate, School Psychology, Fordham University 
Presentation Format: Workshop 
Skill Level: All 
Abstract: This workshop will provide an overview of drama therapy, with a focus on trauma-informed practices when working with early adolescents. Drama therapy is the intentional use of drama and theatre principles to achieve therapeutic goals and promote well-being. With attention to complex trauma and developmental needs of early adolescence, participants will receive an overview of the impact of trauma on social development, cognitive maturation, and emotional regulation. Trauma-informed drama therapy offers an embodied approach that uses metaphor, narrative, and relational play to encourage healthy attachment and cognitive flexibility, two identified factors that are impacted by trauma exposure in early adolescence. In line with the conference theme, the concurrent use of kinesthetic and imaginative exercises works to counter the disconnect between brain and body due to trauma exposure. Participants will have an opportunity to engage in brief drama therapy exercises that demonstrate this approach, as well as learn how these exercises have been applied in clinical practice with individuals and groups.  

Learning Objectives:

  1. List three ways trauma impairs the developmental trajectory of early adolescence.
  2. Describe principles of trauma-informed drama therapy, with a focus on the integration of brain and body.
  3. Demonstrate three embodied exercises that utilize trauma-informed drama therapy.

Christine Mayor, MA, BCT/RDT, PhD student, Lyle S. Hallman Faculty of Social Work, Wilfrid Laurier; Jason S. Frydman, MA, RDT, LCAT, PhD candidate, School Psychology, Fordham University

Panel
Rm 6214

An Inside Look at a Peer Led, Relational Based Model of Clinical Supervision in the Women Recovering from Abuse Program (WRAP) at Women’s College Hospital

Presenters: Sue MacRae, RN, RP, M.Ed 1, Anne Fourt, M.Ed OTC (Reg)2, Marlene Duarte Giles, MSW, RSW3, Abby Hershler, MD, FRCPC4, Almuth Weigeldt, RP5 and Victory Lall, BScN, MN6

  1. Women’s College Hospital Women Recovering from Abuse Program (WRAP) and the Trauma Therapy Program (TTP).  Adjunct Professor, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto 
  2. Women’s College Hospital Women Recovering from Abuse Program (WRAP) and the Trauma Therapy Program (TTP).  Assistant Professor, Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of Toronto.  Cross appointed to the Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto 
  3. Women’s College Hospital Women Recovering from Abuse Program (WRAP) and the Trauma Therapy Program (TTP).  Adjunct Lecturer Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work and Adjunct Lecturer, Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto 
  4. Women’s College Hospital Women Recovering from Abuse Program (WRAP) and General Psychiatry Program.  Lecturer, Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto 
  5. Women’s College Hospital Trauma Therapy Program (TTP).  Lecturer, Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto 
  6. Toronto Public Health Supervised Injection Service & The Works Needle Exchange 

Presentation Format: Panel Discussion 
Skill Level: All 
Abstract: The Women Recovering from Abuse Program (WRAP) is a unique program at Women’s College Hospital (WCH) in Toronto that provides an intensive, group-based relational psychotherapy day treatment program for women who are childhood trauma survivors. A case-study review done recently revealed deeper insights into the WRAP supervision model as it related to its’ essential elements, benefits, challenges and trauma applications. Findings suggest that interdisciplinary team members identify a crucial aspect of their ability to engage in this work relates to the availability of a relationally based peer supervision. The team described that the context of working with trauma survivors raises the need for a safe environment for discussing challenges in client care, addressing personal and professional impact of the work, negotiating interpersonal conflict, preventing vicarious trauma/burnout, and allowing learners to develop their professional skills. Trauma workers must balance the emotional impact of working with the client, while maintaining a therapeutic relationship and allowing a space for thinking and reflecting. The role of clinical supervision in helping those treating trauma survivors to achieve this balance is critical. This inter-professional panel will explore these findings and shared professional experiences in applying this model. Dialogue with the audience will be encouraged.  

Learning objectives:

  1. Describe the essential elements of relationally-based supervision model
  2. Identify the benefits and challenges of a relationally-based supervision model
  3. List applications of this relational supervision model to different trauma contexts

Sue MacRae, RN, RP, M.Ed; Anne Fourt, M.Ed OTC (Reg); Marlene Duarte Giles, MSW, RSW; Abby Hershler, MD, FRCPC; Almuth Weigeldt, RP; and Victory Lall, BScN, MN

2:30 - 2:45pm

Refreshment Break

2:45 - 3:45pm

Dr. Catherine Classen** Keynote Address

Ame Cutler, PhD
Topic: The Somatic Narrative in the Treatment of Trauma: A Sensorimotor Psychotherapy Approach

3:45 - 4:00pm

Q&A Session

4:00pm

Closing Remarks

Please note agenda subject to change.

* The Levine Family Lectureship is made possible through the generous support of the Levine Quadruplet Endowment Fund, established at Women’s College Hospital (WCH) through the vision and support of the Cowan-Levine Family. The fund was established by the family in appreciation for WCH’s leadership in saving the lives of women of all ages, stages and socioeconomic backgrounds.
** Dr. Catherine Classen is the founder of Trauma Talks and a dedicated contributor to the field of Trauma-Informed Care. She was the Academic Leader of the Trauma Therapy Program at the Women’s College Hospital for 12 years and, in 2015, was named Psychologist of the Year by the Traumatic Stress Section of the Canadian Psychological Society. Dr. Classen is currently a professor at the University of California and Director of the Division of Trauma Recovery Services at Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital.

 

 

Location

Women’s College Hospital Conference Centre
76 Grenville Street
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
M5S 1B2

             


Women's College Hospital