Trauma Talks

Poster Sessions

Neurofeedback and Transcranial Direct Stimulation with Sensorimotor Psychotherapy for Complex PTSD and Dissociation

Child Sexual Abuse Trauma Symptoms as a Predictor of Higher Education Completion

Child Sexual Abuse Survivors' Experiences of Polyvictimization: Impacts on Trauma Symptoms and Income Levels

Yoga and Male Gender Socialization

Crisis Interventions Using Trauma-Informed Approach: Best Practice Guideline Development Process & Findings

Organizational Implementation of Trauma- and Violence-Informed Care: A Case Study Analysis

Psychoeducational Trauma Support Groups for Women with Opioid Use Disorders in a Residential Setting

Drama Therapy: An Embodied and Relational Approach to Trauma Treatment

Student-based interprofessional initiative to enhance trauma informed care pedagogy


Neurofeedback and Transcranial Direct Stimulation with Sensorimotor Psychotherapy for Complex PTSD and Dissociation 
Presenters: Jan Ohm, RP, Sensorimotor Psychotherapist; Jennifer Sprague, B.Sc., RP, BCN 
Presentation Format: Poster 
Skill Level: All 
Abstract: The poster presents a case study of a middle-aged trauma victim with a DDNOS diagnosis. The application of neurofeedback and neural therapy, in conjunction with body-oriented psychotherapy was used to advance the healing process for a structurally dissociated, highly traumatized patient. (Van der Hart, Nijenhuis & Steele, 2006) 
In Stage 1 treatment (Herman, "Complex PTSD," n.d.), Sensorimotor Psychotherapy was used to develop somatic resources for stabilization and self-regulation and to provide psychological education about the effects of trauma on the central nervous system. NeurOptimal neurofeedback was utilized to facilitate neuroplasticity, increase capacity for body sensation and affect tolerance (Window of Tolerance, Ogden, Minton & Pain, 2006), and to assist in integrating therapeutic gains. A course of Pulsed Electromagnetic Field Therapy and Transcranial Direct Current/Alternating Current was introduced in accordance with a qEEG brain map and patient interviews to facilitate enhanced neurological coherence and phase correction. Sensorimotor Psychotherapy continued during and after the course of neural therapy to resolve traumatic memory and integrate change. 
After neural therapies, the patient identified with new experiences more in keeping with Stage 3 (Herman, "Complex PTSD," n.d.) treatment objectives. Patient reported his recovery accelerated to the point that he could experience living in the present where the threat of physical and psychological harm no longer felt as imminent.
Conclusions: Neurofeedback and Direct Stimulation Neurotherapy in conjunction with Sensorimotor Psychotherapy have advanced a dissociated trauma patient to Phase 3 treatment in a significantly shorter period than psychotherapy alone.

Learning Objectives:

Whether Neurofeedback and Direct Stimulation Neurotherapy in conjunction with Sensorimotor Psychotherapy can advance the healing of a DDNOS, Complex PTSD patient to Phase 3 treatment within a significantly shorter time period than psychotherapy alone.


Child Sexual Abuse Trauma Symptoms as a Predictor of Higher Education Completion 
Presenter: Molly R. Wolf, LMSW, PhD, Edinboro University of Pennsylvania 
Contributing Authors: Kim Hardner, MSSA, DSW, Edinboro University of Pennsylvania; Elaine Rinfrette, PhD, LCSW-R, Edinboro University of Pennsylvania 
Presentation Format: Poster  
Skill Level: All 
Abstract: 
Background and Purpose: It is well established that childhood sexual abuse (CSA) is associated with serious consequences (Dube et al, 2005; Putnam, 2009), leading to trauma symptoms (Eisenberg, Gollust, Golberstein, & Hefner, 2007). The objective of this study was to examine whether trauma symptoms predicted college non-completion. 
Methods: After obtaining approval from the IRB, this retrospective quantitative online study anonymously surveyed 297 adult survivors of CSA. The measures used were 1) CSA Subscale of the Computer Assisted Maltreatment Inventory (CAMI; DiLillo, Hayes-Skelton, Fortier, Perry, & Evans, 2010), 2) Trauma Symptom Checklist-40 (TSC-40; Elliott & Briere, 1992), and demographics questions to assess highest level of education attained. 
Results: Linear regressions suggest that Anxiety, Depression, Sleep Problems, Sexual Abuse Trauma, and total scores on the TSC-40, were significantly negatively predictive of higher education attainment, in that as trauma symptoms rose, higher education decreased (all p’s < .05).  
Conclusions/Implications: Higher education provides CSA survivors with knowledge, power, and control over the direction of their lives. However, trauma symptoms negatively impact students from completing higher education. Institutions of higher learning can use this information to be a part of the solution, by creating safe environments for survivors to heal, grow, and learn. 

Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will be able to define and evaluate the types of trauma symptoms associated with child sexual abuse.
  2. Participants will be able to interpret and discuss the ways that trauma symptoms lead to college non-completion.
  3. Participants will be able to identify and discuss the ways that higher education institutions can create safe environments for survivors of child sexual abuse to successfully complete college.

Child Sexual Abuse Survivors' Experiences of Polyvictimization: Impacts on Trauma Symptoms and Income Levels 
Presenters: Molly R. Wolf, LMSW, PhD, Edinboro University of Pennsylvania; Shraddha Prabhu, MSW, PhD, Edinboro University of Pennsylvania 
Presentation Format: Poster 
Skill Level: All 
Abstract:  
Background/Purpose: Researchers across disciplines, and particularly in the field of child maltreatment and interpersonal violence, have identified the importance of obtaining complete victimization profiles (Espelage et al., 2016; Hamby et al., 2011). Certain individuals are particularly vulnerable to chronic exposure to multiple forms of violence and adversities (Anda et al., 2002; Finkelhor et al., 2007). The current study examined the impact of polyvictimization among adult survivors of childhood sexual abuse 
Methods: The anonymous sample (n= 244 adult survivors of child sexual abuse) was gathered online, and the following measures were administered: Brief Betrayal Trauma Survey (BBTS; Goldberg & Freyd, 2006); Trauma Symptom Checklist-40 (TSC-40; Elliott & Briere, 1992); The CSA Subscale of the Computer Assisted Maltreatment Inventory (CAMI; DiLillo et al., 2010).
Results/Implications: Polyvictimization in childhood (in combination with child sexual abuse) significantly predicted higher trauma symptoms, higher dissociation, and lower income levels (all p’s <.05). Such results suggest that clinical work with these survivors should account for cumulative victimizations survived in childhood, and their impact on adult well-being. Holistic interventions that take into account the complexity of the experiences of the survivors would be more effective in meeting their needs, and ensuring a path towards life-long healing.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will be able to define and evaluate the types of polyvictimizations that can occur in childhood.
  2. Participants will be able to interpret and discuss the ways that polyvictimization leads to trauma symptoms.
  3. Participants will be able to identify and discuss the differences between experiencing victimization, and witnessing victimization, and the fact that both lead to trauma symptoms.

Yoga and Male Gender Socialization 
Presenters: Lisa Greenbaum Hons BA, E-RYT 500, C-IAYT. Lisa is the Director of YogaFit Canada and an International Trainer and Speaker with a focus on teaching trauma-informed yoga. Robert Chuckman MSW. Robert is a clinical manager and psychotherapist at Hope Place Centres, a gender-specific treatment centre that serves men and women in the Toronto area. He has been practicing yoga for over 20 years. 
Presentation Format: Poster 
Skill Level: All 
Abstract: 
Male violence is a pressing social issue. Revelations of high profile male abusers have now precipitated a social-wide movement of grief and awareness into how masculinity and power commonly frame violence against women. Some of the many difficult conversations emanating from this have included discourses that both challenge and seek to understand male gender socialization.  
In the clinical context, when male abusers seek therapy they not only encounter their own abnormal psychologies, they also find previous abuse histories, while also facing a profusion of unhealthy social messaging about what it means to “be a man.” These socially generated identities are inhibitory to men’s development as contrite, conscious and compassionate. 
This presentation discusses trauma informed yoga practice as an adjunct intervention for men facing their abuse of others, and their own personal abuse histories. Participants will come away with a brief series of yoga asanas (kriya) geared towards expressive masculinity, understand how these can be applied in clinical settings, and how the basic movements and teachings of yoga can form a positive locus of critique for unhealthy male gender socialization. These themes will be connected throughout to the research literature on the topics discussed.  

Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will be given a handout, summarizing our poster's brief, trauma informed yoga practice designed as gender specific intervention strategy, and the main research/ practice presented in the poster.
  2. Participants will be able to summarize the basic principles of trauma informed care, how these can be used to positively address male gender socialization.
  3. Participants will be given the opportunity to ask questions on these topics, and offered further resources.
  4. Participants will be given our reference list/ sources, pointing to further research/ interest.

Crisis Interventions Using Trauma-Informed Approach: Best Practice Guideline Development Process & Findings 
Presenter: Nafsin Nizum, Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario 
Presentation Format: Poster 
Skill Level: All 
Abstract: There is growing recognition for the need for health and social services and systems to integrate knowledge of the prevalence and impacts of trauma into service delivery. This integration of trauma-informed principles is particularly relevant in the context of crisis intervention, wherein causing further emotional harm is heightened. To date, there are no best practices for nurses and the interprofessional team on providing trauma-informed crisis interventions for adults. In June 2016, the Registered Nurses’ Association of Ontario (RNAO) convened a broad group of experts to serve on a panel that would help inform the development of a best practice guideline (BPG) that provides evidence-based recommendations for trauma-informed crisis management. In total, 15 subject matter experts from areas of nursing, medicine, social work, the justice system, research and person with lived experience formed the expert panel. Four systematic literature reviews were conducted to answer four broad research questions. The systematic review findings and panel input informed seven practice recommendations, two education recommendations and four system, organization, and policy recommendations. All recommendations were agreed upon by expert panel members through a modified-Delphi consensus process. Finalized recommendations will be published in the upcoming RNAO BPG Crisis Interventions for Adults Using a Trauma-Informed Approach.  

Learning Objectives:

  1. Learn about the Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario guideline development process (including systematic review processes and expert panel involvement). 
  2. Understand the interdisciplinary nature of crisis management and the need for best practices that are trauma-informed. 
  3. Review recommendations from the recently published RNAO Best Practice Guideline regarding trauma-informed crisis interventions.

Organizational Implementation of Trauma- and Violence-Informed Care: A Case Study Analysis  
Presenter: Tanaz Javan PhD (c), Health Information Science, Western University  
Presentation Format: Poster 
Skill Level: All 
Abstract: Health and social inequities are increasing, especially for those already marginalized by systemic barriers, such as poverty, and who face discrimination and racism. Many people, across the socio-economic spectrum, have experienced various forms of trauma and violence; for those facing structural barriers and marginalization, these exposures, and their consequences, are often worse, making it even more difficult to access health and social services. To address these challenges, there is a call to explicitly integrate equity-oriented care to address barriers and improve outcomes by addressing both individual and social/structural determinants of health. A core aspect of equity-oriented care is attention to trauma and violence, and their effects, and a commitment to minimizing harm by adopting what we call trauma- and violence-informed care (TVIC).  This study is a mixed methods case study examining the implementation processes of TVIC in multiple organizations in London Ontario. Participating organizations will be asked to complete an initial assessment to understand their current stage of TVIC readiness. Interviews with leaders and key staff will then be conducted to understand factors related to integrating TVIC into the organization. These interviews will be repeated at three and six months to examine how the implementation and integration process unfolds.  

Learning Objectives:

This study proposes an in-depth analysis of select organizations to understand why and how they implement TVIC, with specific attention to contextual factors that influence decisions. In other words, the aim is to understand processes and strategies that are involved in the integration of TVIC in three to five community-based health and social service organizations in London. This exploratory, formative research will examine the cultural and structural shifts that organizations undertake to implement TVIC.


Psychoeducational Trauma Support Groups for Women with Opioid Use Disorders in a Residential Setting 
Presenters: Erin Bascug, MS, and Susan A. Green, LCSW, 
Institute on Trauma and Trauma-Informed Care, University at Buffalo 
Contributing authors: Chelsie Ciminelli, MSW; Mickey Sperlich, PhD; Samantha Koury, LMSW; Travis Hales, MSW, PhD Candidate; and Tom Nochajski, PhD 
Presentation Format: Poster 
Skill Level: All
Abstract: Pregnant women with histories of substance use disorder (SUD) may be willing to change their behaviors to benefit their children (Coyer, 2003; Hall & van Teijlingen, 2006). Consequently, interventions that enhance the parent–child relationship have the possibility of prompting recovery and abstinence for mothers and mothers-to-be (Kahn et al., 2017). In response to this need, The Institute on Trauma and Trauma-Informed Care piloted a study in which a curriculum was developed to determine best practices for conducting client-centered psychoeducational trauma support groups for women in a residential treatment setting with opioid use disorder. The curriculum builds upon another support group intervention for pregnant and parenting women (Kahn et al., 2017), which was performed in an outpatient medical practice that provides medication-assisted treatment. The current intervention added Seeking Safety, an evidence-based trauma treatment for individuals experiencing PTSD and substance abuse, and expanded content to address the specific needs of women in residential treatment. The curriculum covers a range of educational content including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD); addiction and the brain; overcoming guilt, stigma, and shame; parenting tips; intimate partner violence; and responding to children with sensitivity. Preliminary data regarding feasibility, acceptability, and efficacy of this approach are presented.

Learning Objectives:

  1. The participants will be able to demonstrate a basic understanding regarding implementation of the developed curriculum.
  2. The participants will be able to describe how the psychoeducation
    modules interconnect with the Seeking Safety modules.
  3. The participants will be able to describe how preliminary data supports the efficacy of the developed curriculum in a residential treatment setting.

Drama Therapy: An Embodied and Relational Approach to Trauma Treatment 
Presenter: Alicia Winn, M.A. Drama Therapy, C.C.C. 
Presentation Format: Poster 
Skill Level: All 
Abstract: Drama therapy is a creative arts therapy that uses embodiment, among other processes, to achieve change in clients. Depending on the population, therapists may use a range of methods and techniques in their work with clients. In this presentation, we'll explore the 8 core processes of drama therapy, as defined by renowned drama therapist Phil Jones. We will then look at a case study using embodied drama therapy techniques. During my research at the Jewish General Hospital in the child psychiatry day program, I explored the way that dance/movement and drama activities can be used to enhance the relationships between children and their caregivers. The group in question consisted of children with diagnoses of ADHD and ODD, accompanied by their primary caregiver. Through embodied drama and movement-based exercises, the dyads worked on various secure attachment principles, including increasing sharing eye-contact and enjoying being in close proximity to each other, sustaining cooperation, developing kinesthetic attunement to each other, and an ability to share imaginative play. The concepts will be disseminated in a way that addresses and pays tribute to a social justice perspective. 

Learning Objectives:

  1. Gain familiarity (in a cognitive and embodied way) with the ways that Drama Therapy techniques can be applied to work with attachment-related trauma.
  2. Be able to cite prominent drama therapists currently working in the field.
  3. Be able to name and define the 8 core processes of drama therapy. This will be achieved through both didactic and embodied exercises.

Student-based interprofessional initiative to enhance trauma informed care pedagog
Presenters: Rachelle Marek, BA (hons), BScN; Daniela Graziano, BSc (hons), MSc, BScN (candidate); Aja Toste, BSc (hons), BScN; Sarah Freeman, BSc (hons), MD (candidate); Athena Hau, BSc (hons), BScN (candidate) 
Contributing Authors: Sarah Kanji, BSc, MSc, MD (candidate); Julia Pasquale, BMSc, MSc, MD (candidate) 
Presentation Format: Poster 
Skill Level: All 
Focus: Faculty engagement and curriculum innovation  
Abstract: 
Purpose: 
To provide an interprofessional workshop on trauma informed care (TIC) as an innovative solution to providing additional TIC training into medical and accelerated nursing curricula.  
Methods: 
An interdisciplinary team of nursing and medicine students from the University of Toronto collaborated to offer a full-day (7 hour) TIC workshop. The total number of participants consisted of 75 nursing and medicine students from three different schools across Ontario. The event included the following: a narrative project on adverse health experiences; an introduction to TIC; concurrent sessions on interviewing, physical assessments, and moving forward from disclosure (including safety planning, self-care, burnout, and vicarious trauma); and an interdisciplinary panel highlighting their experiences of working within a framework of TIC.  
To evaluate the success of this model, each participant was asked to complete a workshop evaluation, as well as pre- and post-surveys to assess changes in their level of knowledge and confidence in integrating trauma informed care and its related skills.  
Findings and Conclusion  
At this time responses are still being accepted and processed.   

Learning Objectives:

  1. To describe effective strategies to integrating comprehensive trauma informed care into nursing and medicine curricula.
  2. To describe the outcomes of a one-day trauma informed care event on participants’ confidence in and application of trauma informed care practices.
  3. To expand and replicate workshops in other universities and across healthcare settings.

 

Women's College Hospital